When did Bob Brenly join the Toronto Blue Jays?

When did Bob Brenly join the Toronto Blue Jays?

June 21, 1976: Signed by the San Francisco Giants as an amateur free agent. December 21, 1988: Released by the San Francisco Giants. January 18, 1989: Signed as a Free Agent with the Toronto Blue Jays. July 18, 1989: Released by the Toronto Blue Jays. August 2, 1989: Signed as a Free Agent with the San Francisco Giants.

How old was Bob Brenly when he played for the Giants?

Brenly was not drafted but signed as an amateur free agent by the San Francisco Giants in 1976. He made his major league debut in 1981 at the age of 27.

Who is Bob Brenly and what did he do?

Bob Brenly. Robert Earl Brenly (born February 25, 1954) is an American baseball sportscaster and a former professional baseball player, coach and manager.

When did Bob Brenly play for the Red Sox?

Bob Brenly married Joan Brenly on August 10, 1974; they have two children. Their son Michael was drafted by the Chicago Cubs in 2004 (out of high school) and 2008 (out of UNLV) as a catcher. He played in the Cubs and Boston Red Sox minor league systems in all or parts of eight seasons spanning 2008–2015.

Who was the catcher for the San Francisco Giants?

Robert Earl Brenly (born February 25, 1954) is an American baseball sportscaster and a former professional baseball player, coach and manager. He played the majority of his Major League Baseball career as a catcher with the San Francisco Giants.

When did Bob Brenly manage the Arizona Diamondbacks?

He replaced Buck Showalter as manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks after the 2000 season, and led the Diamondbacks to the 2001 World Series title in his first season as a manager. Although the team repeated as Western Division champions in 2002, a slide which left the team in last place in mid-2004 led to Brenly’s dismissal.

What are fielding stats in Major League Baseball?

Fielding stats are a combination of official records and RetroSheet records. Both are likely to have substantial errors and will not match perfectly. Leagues historically made no effort to balance team, league, and player fielding stats.